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PRWeek honors Raytheon VP for her influence and leadership

PRWeek named Raytheon VP Pamela A. Wickham to its 'Hall of Femme' roster of influential communicators.

International public relations trade journal PRWeek has named Pam Wickham, Raytheon’s vice president for Corporate Affairs and Communications, to its “Hall of Femme” roster of influential female marketing and communications executives around the world. Wickham received the honor during a June 1 ceremony in New York City.

PRWeek founded the Hall of Femme in 2016.

“In an industry dominated by women, the PRWeek Hall of Femme and Champions of PR celebrate a powerful group of women who, through talent and tenacity, achieved amazing career milestones, worked tirelessly to make a difference in the world and helped pave the way for future generations of women,” PRWeek Executive Editor Bernadette Casey said in a release.

Since joining Raytheon in 2005, Wickham has led the company’s communications, corporate reputation, brand management, employee, executive and international communications, PR, public affairs and special events. She was an early adopter of digital/social media and analytics, embedding them in the company's communications team. Under her leadership, Raytheon has established a strong brand, award-winning corporate citizenship platforms and employee engagement practices that helped align the organization to the company’s vision: to make the world a safer place.

“I feel lucky to work for a company that’s driven by innovation, collaboration and passionate people,” Wickham said. “I’m engaged in all the areas that drive me professionally, while leading a team of highly motivated employees who are always pushing the boundaries of communications.”

Prior to her tenure at Raytheon, Wickham served in communications positions at Porter Novelli Public Relations, Ketchum Public Relations, General Electric and Hewlett Packard. Helping legendary CEO Jack Welch understand the importance of the then-new online world, she helped lead GE to become one of the first non-tech, Fortune 100 companies to register a website domain name. Under her tenure, GE also established its first companywide intranet system.

In 2016, she was honored by PR News as one of the Top Women in PR and named one of ExecRank’s 50 Top CMOs and Marketing Executives. In 2015, the Publicity Club of New England awarded her the John J. Molloy Crystal Bell Lifetime Achievement Award. Wickham was also recognized by BusinessNext Social on Forbes.com as among the Top 20 Most Social CMOs in the Fortune 100.

An advocate for equality in the workplace, Wickham is a member of the corporate leadership board of the Massachusetts Conference of Women, sits on Raytheon’s Executive Diversity Leadership Team and serves as executive champion of the Raytheon’s Women Network, Raytheon’s Black Employee Network and the Raytheon Political Action Committee.

“One of the most important aspects of leadership is engagement – not just with your particular team, but across all aspects of the organization,” said Wickham. “I love the time I spend mentoring and engaging employees across the enterprise; it keeps me grounded and helps me experience the company’s culture from a number of different perspectives.”

Wickham is a member of the Arthur Page Society, an association for senior communications executives. She also funds the Marjorie Wickham Memorial Scholarship at Lee High School in Massachusetts, which provides grants to female graduates pursuing higher education. She is the former chairwoman of the communications counsel of the Aerospace Industries Association.

“There are thousands of examples of communicators owning their chairs every day, doing good work behind the scenes – not just for their companies or their clients, but for their profession and their own personal integrity,” said Wickham. “It’s my constant motivation: Are we doing the best work possible? Are we giving 200 percent every day? When the answer is yes, it’s time to raise the bar again.”

Last Updated: 06/05/2017

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